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Oriole Park At Camden Yards

Oriole Park At Camden Yards Tickets

Oriole Park at Camden Yards
Oriole Park at Camden Yards is state-of-the-art unique yet traditional baseball stadium which became the official home of the Baltimore Orioles of Major League Baseball on April 6, 1992. Built at the southwest corner of downtown Baltimore, the ballpark is about a 15-minute walk to the city?s fabulous Inner Harbor. The skyscrapers that make up the Baltimore skyline hover just beyond the ballpark and are visible to the majority of fans in the three-tiered grandstand.

Buy Oriole Park At Camden Yards Tickets

Oriole Park At Camden Yards Tickets Information

When former Baltimore mayor William Donald Schaefer became governor of Maryland in the mid-1980s, he helped push plans for a baseball-only stadium through the state legislature. In 1989, construction began on an all-new, baseball-only ballpark for the Baltimore Orioles. Construction lasted 33 months and the ballpark opened on April 6, 1992, when the Orioles hosted the Cleveland Indians. After considerable debate on whether to name the new ballpark "Oriole Park" or "Camden Yards" - former Orioles owner Eli Jacobs favored Oriole Park while then-Maryland Governor William Donald Schaefer favored Camden Yards - a compromise was reached to use both names.
Camden Yards helped pioneer many of the modern-day concepts that ballparks at all levels of the sport now embrace, chiefly a traditional, yet original, design that blends into a highly-visible downtown location with a signature feature distinct to the ballpark. Steel, rather than concrete trusses, an arched brick facade, a sun roof over the gentle slope of the upper deck, an asymmetrical playing field, and natural grass turf are just some of the features that tie it to those magnificent big league ballparks built in the early 1900's. The signature feature of Camden Yards is the 94-year-old landmark B & O Warehouse, beyond right field. It was originally going to be torn down to make way for the ballpark but was preserved and assimilated into the design of Camden Yards. In addition to its aesthetic beauty, this eight storey building provides unique office space for the Orioles and other tenants.
To ensure that all fans will have an unobstructed view of the ball game, the Orioles do not permit the hanging or carrying of banners anywhere in the ballpark. Banners may be displayed before and after the game and between innings only. Banners are subject to confiscation if the content is commercial, political, and/or in bad taste according to the Orioles discretion. Eutaw Street is the festive area runs parallel to the Warehouse and separates it from the seating areas. The 60-foot wide concourse is packed with souvenir and concession stands. Fans strolling down Eutaw Street might look for any of the following: the brass baseballs embedded into the sidewalk marking the spot where home runs cleared the right field fence and landed on Eutaw Street; a plaque to mark the spot where Ken Griffey Jr. hit the warehouse during the All-Star Home Run Hitting Contest; the Orioles Hall of Fame plaques which are located near the north end of Eutaw Street; and, just outside the North end of Eutaw Street and Gate H are the 4-foot aluminum monuments depicting retired Orioles uniform numbers and the Babe Ruth statue.
There are two major electronic information centers in the ballpark as well as an out of town scoreboard to enhance enjoyment of the game. Mounted on top of one of the board is a large double faced clock built in Maryland that can be read from both inside and outside the ballpark and in downtown Baltimore. Camden Yards hosted the 1993 MLB All-Star Game. On June 18, 1994, 43 fans were injured in an escalator accident; one of the stadium's multiple-story escalators, overcrowded with fans heading to their upper-deck seats, jerked backward, throwing passengers to the bottom landing. On September 6, 1995, Camden Yards witnessed Cal Ripken, Jr.'s record-setting 2,131st consecutive game (the layout of the playing field was, in fact, somewhat designed to match Ripken's hitting style). Attendees of the game included President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore, as well as Cal Ripken, Sr., who had not been to a game since being fired by the O's.
Exactly one year later, Eddie Murray blasted his 500th home run there. On October 6, 2001 Cal Ripken, Jr.'s final MLB game was held here. Ripken's last game was originally scheduled to be played against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium. However, the tragic events of September 11 forced this game (previously scheduled to be played on September 16) to become his final game. The Boston Red Sox defeated the Orioles 5-1, while Ripken went 0-3. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Red Sox pitcher David Cone recorded the final out against Brady Anderson while Ripken waited on deck. Former President Bill Clinton and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig were in attendance.
The only no-hitter thrown at Camden Yards to date was tossed by Hideo Nomo, then with the Boston Red Sox, on April 4, 2001. Nomo faced 30 Orioles batters, walking Mike Bordick twice and Chris Richard once, as the Red Sox won, 3-0. The current single game highest attendance record at Camden Yards is 49,828, set on 7/10/05 against the Boston Red Sox. On site stadium lots for Season Permit Holders, and a limited amount of general parking is available in Lot H. However, a short 10-15 minute walk will place you outside the most congested area, may cost less, and will allow you to get on the road before many who park next to the ballpark.